Sinners / Pecadores

Sinners

Glory to God

Blessings, “But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Romans 5:8, NIV).

Would you sacrifice your child for someone who was undeserving? That is exactly what God did for us with His Son, Jesus Christ. Even though we were worthless, useless, and dead in our sins, God gave us dignity and eternal life by selflessly sacrificing Jesus to pay for our sins. Permit the Holy Spirit to work in you as we allow God to guard our heart. Thank God, obey His commands, and follow Jesus, the ONE, who did lay His Life down for us giving us a glorious opportunity (if we choose it) to reconcile with God. Please do have a blessed day reflecting on the Goodness of GOD! GOD BLESS.

Pecadores

Gloria a Dios

Bendiciones, “Pero Dios demuestra su amor por nosotros en esto: en que cuando todavía éramos pecadores, Cristo murió por nosotros” (Romanos 5:8, NVI).

¿Sacrificarías a tu hijo por alguien que no lo merecía? Eso es exactamente lo que Dios hizo por nosotros con Su Hijo, Jesucristo. A pesar de que estábamos indignos, inútiles y muertos en nuestros pecados, Dios nos dio la dignidad y la vida eterna mediante el sacrificio de Jesús para que pagara por nuestros pecados. Permite que el Espíritu Santo obre en ti al dejar que Dios guarde tu corazón. De las gracias a Dios, obedezca Sus mandamientos y sigamos a Jesús, AQUEL quien dio Su Vida por nosotros dándonos una oportunidad gloriosa (si lo elegimos) para reconciliarnos con Dios. ¡Por favor, tengan un día bendecido reflexionando sobre la bondad de Dios! DIOS BENDIGA.

Spiritual Q-Tips

JeffKlickPhoto-138-207-06162014Spiritual Q-Tips

Most of us struggle with our past. We have failed, sinned, and generally messed up somehow someway. While this struggle is tough enough for our own minds to deal with, it is compounded when we marry. “The two shall become one,” is a Biblical truth. Our reality often falls short of this statement.

Two imperfect people stand before someone like me and boldly state their vows. These promises are made in good faith, and usually contain words like, “love, serve, honor, faithful, and forever.” Life experience, and most statistical studies, confirms the truth that these promises are not kept.

How do two people who sincerely love one another go from stating these vows lovingly looking into each other’s eyes to divorce? At one time just being together was enough to bring joy to the heart and a smile to the face. A gentle touch on the hand would send shivers down the spine. Two lovers couldn’t wait to be together, but now, they can’t wait to get away from each other. What happened?

There are of course many reasons, but the one I want to focus on deals with how we hear one another. Many times, as two people live together in marriage, the way we listen to each other changes. I am not talking about the ability to discern decibels, but how we listen to one another.

Hurts and wounds are inevitable in marriage. Disappointments, harsh words, unkindness, thoughtlessness, and selfishness will invade every marriage at some time or another. In fact, I believe it is nearly impossible for two people to live together without irritations arising. What we do with those irritations, hurts, wounds, and disappointments will have a direct impact on our hearing.

When we are the receiving end of a hurt or harsh word from our spouse, we have a choice to make. This choice will impact more than just the current situation. In fact, our choice will have the potential to affect almost every future conversation we have with our spouse. We must choose wisely.

If we allow the hurt, harshness, selfishness, or any other less than desirable behavior of our spouse to reside in our heart and fail to deal with it, our hearing becomes impaired. Whenever we have the next conflict or discussion with our spouse, the unresolved issue interferes with our ability to hear clearly.

We will begin to hear our spouse through the filter of that unresolved issue. We will soon begin to assign motives to them, interpreting what they say through that hearing aid, and in most cases, it will distort the current conversation.

We soon begin to use words like, “always,” and “never” in our discussions. Typically we will become defensive and assume that our spouse is attacking us, even when they are not. A simple question like, “Did you get the laundry finished today?” can escalate into a full scale war of words.

The one being asked the question allows a rush of past wounds and thoughts to be attached to the motives of the one asking. “They think I am lazy. Why are they always criticizing me? They don’t appreciate me for all I do, but always have to point out where I fall short.” etc.

While these thoughts or ones like them rush in, the one asking the question simply wanted to know if a shirt was washed. A simple question launches an argument and additional hurts and wounds. If left to fester, every conversation after this one now includes all the previously received wounds and is further distorted by the laundry discussion. When the next issues arise, even more communication ground has been lost.

We have a listening problem, but really it is a heart issue. We simply don’t know how to communicate to our spouse our hurt or to learn to let go of offenses. We fail to deal with the issues when they arise, and the cost is huge later on. How many couples have walked away from one another in anger because they couldn’t talk any more?

  • “You don’t understand?”
  • “You just don’t get it?”
  • “Why can’t you see this?”
  • “If you loved me you would understand”
  • “I can’t talk to you anymore.”

What really happened is an ear buildup of hurt wax. We need to clean out our ears so we can hear the one we love without all that buildup hindering what is really being said. We need to be in the current conversation without allowing all the previous ones to distort this one. This is not easy, but we must learn to deal with our hearing loss, if we hope to avoid becoming another statistic.

There are several ways to deal with a wound, hurt, or disappointment other than allowing it to simmer into anger and bitterness. We can simply overlook it. Proverbs 19:11 states that it is a man’s (or woman’s) glory to overlook an offense. We can choose to assume the best of our spouse instead of the worst. We can assign them good motives instead of evil ones. We have that choice.

If we can’t overlook the offense, we can continue the discussion. We need to ask what I call “The next question.” When your spouse says something to you that rubs you the wrong way, before reacting make sure you understand what they actually meant by what they said. For example ask: “This is what I heard you say, is that what you meant?” You both might be surprised by the answer.

Another technique is to not react to the reaction of your spouse. If you ask a question and get some surprising, hostile response, try to figure out what caused it. Something is going on. There is something not right and arguing won’t help. Loving, caring discussion often will. Rarely do we have all the information in any given situation. Not reacting to the reaction will help calm down the reaction.

Remember at one time you couldn’t wait to be with this person. You longed for the day when you could spend the rest of your life together. You wished your time talking, touching, and simply being together would never end. Something changed. What was it? Almost always the answer involves communication based problems, and hurt infected ears. Maybe we all just need some spiritual Q-Tips to help us clear up some of our hearing loss. it can’t hurt, and it might just help.

Dr. Jeff Klick


About Dr. Jeffrey A. Klick
Dr. Jeff Klick has been in fulltime ministry for over thirty years (since 1981). He currently serves as the senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship in Kansas City, Kansas, a church he planted in 1993. Dr. Klick married his high school sweetheart, Leslie, in May of 1975. They have three adult children and ten grandchildren. Dr. Klick loves to learn and has earned a professional designation, Certified Financial Planner, earned a Master’s degree in Pastoral Ministry from Liberty Theological Seminary, a Doctorate in Biblical Studies from Master’s International School of Divinity, and a Ph.D. in Pastoral Ministry from Trinity Theological Seminary . In addition to serving as senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship, Dr. Klick is a consultant with The Institute for Church Management, weekly shares on two radio shows on the Alive in Christ Radio Network, and also serves on the Board of Directors for The Council for Family-Integrated Churches. Dr. Klick is a frequent blogger on several websites and has published multiple books.

Blog and Personal Website: www.jeffklick.com

Author Page for all my books: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B009L3BNLW

Does Your Marriage Have A Prayer?

JeffKlickPhoto-138-207-06162014Does Your Marriage Have A Prayer?

I am not referring to survival, though that may very well be at stake, I am referring to focus. Have we stepped back from our marriages and asked why God wanted us to do this in the first place? Why did God come up with the idea of two people getting together and spending the rest of their days trying to figure out how to live together? What was He thinking? Was He bored and needed some entertainment?

If we remember the Garden of Eden account in Genesis, we can get a glimpse into what God was thinking. After all, it was God who told Adam, “that it was not good for him to be alone.” God is the One who said, “I will make a helper suitable for Adam.” God’s idea, therefore it is logical that He must have a plan and reasons for this activity that we know as marriage.

I do not pretend to know all of God’s reasons but here are some for our consideration. First, Adam was incomplete without Eve. I don’t mean that being single means you are less of a person than someone who is married, I simply am saying that being married will help you to grow and change in ways that being single will not or cannot. When we are single, we have a greater say over many areas of our life. Our time, habits, preferences, goals, can all be developed without the opinion or possible impact on anyone else. This is not true when we are married. We no longer are alone and our actions affect more than ourselves. Paul the apostle put it this way:

I want you to be free from anxieties. The unmarried man is anxious about the things of the Lord, how to please the Lord. But the married man is anxious about worldly things, how to please his wife, and his interests are divided. And the unmarried or betrothed woman is anxious about the things of the Lord, how to be holy in body and spirit. But the married woman is anxious about worldly things, how to please her husband. I say this for your own benefit, not to lay any restraint upon you, but to promote good order and to secure your undivided devotion to the Lord. 1 Corinthians 7:32-35

When we are single, we can maintain a more, “undivided devotion” to the Lord than after we are married. Adam would become someone different with Eve than without Eve. I have a friend whose first wife died after they were married for 20+ years. I knew this man well in the context of his first marriage. I now know him in the context of his second marriage, and while he is the same man, he is different. Being married to his second wife has brought out different characteristics than being married to his first wife. Adam with Eve would be different from Adam without Eve. The same is true with each one of us.

In addition to our personalities developing in conjunction with someone, another reason for marriage is partnership and the maximizing of impact. Consider this passage:

Again, if two lie together, they keep warm, but how can one keep warm alone? And though a man might prevail against one who is alone, two will withstand him—a threefold cord is not quickly broken. Ecclesiastes 4:11-12

Two heads are better than one. Two viewpoints often provide insights that would be missed by only one. No two people think exactly the same way and that is a good thing. In marriage, a husband and wife will often view the same situation from completely different angles. If they can grow to the place where they respect and value each other’s viewpoint, instead of always trying to talk the other one into their own, they will have more wisdom, and probably make better decisions.

God usually draws two people together that are very different in temperament, skill sets, and personality. Why? Does He really have some warped sense of humor or is this part of His plan to help both people develop, grow and mature? If two people are exactly alike, one is not necessary. Since most people will marry someone that is vastly different from them, the growth opportunities abound. Of course, we have to get past the obstacle of our pride in thinking we are always correct, but that is possible. Take it from someone who is proud, it can be done. Not only can we humble ourselves and learn from our spouses, we must if we want to become all that God desires for us.

Another reason for marriage, and this one is both resisted and often overlooked, is the power in prayer that can take place in the union. God states in His word this powerful truth:

Again I say to you, if two of you agree on earth about anything they ask, it will be done for them by my Father in heaven. Matthew 18:19

What an amazing coincidence that marriage involves two people. A husband and wife that will learn to pray together will have great strength and intimacy. The opposite is also true. Almost any Christian married couple will readily agree that they should pray together but how many actually do? Other than a quick bedtime prayer with the children or a short blessing over the meal, how many couples actually pray together? How many should? What would happen if we did?

While I do not know the answer to all of those questions I do know this much. Our marriages would be better off if we learned how to pray together. I also know that our enemy hates praying couples and he will do whatever he can to thwart it. Why? What does he know that we do not seem to? Why is it so hard for a couple to pray together on any regular basis? Should it be? Why would most of agree that we need to pray together but studies show that most of us don’t?

Again, those questions need to be answered and the sooner the better. They need to be answered in our marriages and today would not be too soon. Our marriages are under attack at a record rate – do they have a prayer? If not, why not? Now, that is a question to consider, isn’t it?

About Dr. Jeffrey A. Klick Dr. Jeff Klick has been in fulltime ministry for over thirty years (since 1981). He currently serves as the senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship in Kansas City, Kansas, a church he planted in 1993. Dr. Klick married his high school sweetheart, Leslie, in May of 1975. They have three adult children and ten grandchildren. Dr. Klick loves to learn and has earned a professional designation, Certified Financial Planner, earned a Master’s degree in Pastoral Ministry from Liberty Theological Seminary, a Doctorate in Biblical Studies from Master’s International School of Divinity, and a Ph.D. in Pastoral Ministry from Trinity Theological Seminary . In addition to serving as senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship, Dr. Klick is a consultant with The Institute for Church Management, weekly shares on two radio shows on the Alive in Christ Radio Network, and also serves on the Board of Directors for The Council for Family-Integrated Churches. Dr. Klick is a frequent blogger on several websites and has published multiple books.

Blog and Personal Website: www.jeffklick.com

Author Page for all my books: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B009L3BNLW

Christian Tension

JeffKlickPhoto-138-207-06162014Christian Tension

by Dr. Jeff A Klick. A one-winged bird will not fly straight. In fact, it probably will not fly at all. The bird needs both wings to soar and the imagery is applicable to us. The Bible is full of tensions (two wings) that help keep us air born in our faith. For example:

  • • If you want to be great in the Kingdom of God, learn to be a servant of all.
    • We are saved by grace alone and not by works, yet our faith is proven by our works.
    • God is the Sovereign Lord of the Universe yet we are told to act in certain ways and given a choice to obey or not.
    • God knows all things yet we are told to pray in order to make a difference.
    • We are told to love the sinner yet hate the sin.
    • The devil is a defeated foe yet we are told to resist and overcome him.
    • We are free in Christ yet we limit our freedom for the sake of love.

Those seven are enough to make my point and I am sure you can think of many more. In fact, I found one today during my reading time:

And because lawlessness will be increased, the love of many will grow cold. Matthew 24:12

Interesting. One wing that is often exalted is love, grace and freedom in Christ. We are saved by grace, live in grace, and are under grace, God is love, we are free from guilt, and any mention of obedience, works, or human effort invites a verbal beating. Those on the other side (wing) shout, “Lawlessness” as the danger of over emphasis on grace and God’s love. They continue, “What about obedience, grieving the Holy Spirit, holiness, and overcoming temptation and sin?” Picking either wing at the expense of the other will result in erratic flight patterns.

Over the last 39 years or so, I have observed many that have shouted, “grace, I’m free in Christ!” They are of course correct. However, many times this revelation has resulted in sinful excesses because of that truth. We are warned by Peter:

Live as people who are free, not using your freedom as a cover-up for evil, but living as servants of God. 1 Peter 2:16

Jesus said that because of lawlessness love would grow cold. Interesting. Most people that use grace as a cover for all manner of sin do end up despising anyone that asks for deference or holiness. Perhaps Jesus was right after all. Lawlessness eventually turns love cold.

On the other wing, those that go down the path of law, endless rules and man-made standards of holiness will end up despising everyone that disagrees with them. Sounds like Pharisee thinking to me and Jesus never accused those guys of demonstrating love.

If love is our calling card to the world, and it is, we must learn how to fly with both wings intact. We need grace without lawlessness and obedience without bondage. In other words, we need to be people who know and obey all of the Scriptures, and not just our favorite doctrines.

About Dr. Jeffrey A. Klick Dr. Jeff Klick has been in fulltime ministry for over thirty years (since 1981). He currently serves as the senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship in Kansas City, Kansas, a church he planted in 1993. Dr. Klick married his high school sweetheart, Leslie, in May of 1975. They have three adult children and ten grandchildren. Dr. Klick loves to learn and has earned a professional designation, Certified Financial Planner, earned a Master’s degree in Pastoral Ministry from Liberty Theological Seminary, a Doctorate in Biblical Studies from Master’s International School of Divinity, and a Ph.D. in Pastoral Ministry from Trinity Theological Seminary . In addition to serving as senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship, Dr. Klick is a consultant with The Institute for Church Management, weekly shares on two radio shows on the Alive in Christ Radio Network, and also serves on the Board of Directors for The Council for Family-Integrated Churches. Dr. Klick is a frequent blogger on several websites and has published multiple books.

Blog and Personal Website: www.jeffklick.com

Author Page for all my books: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B009L3BNLW

A Challenge to My Fellow Grandparents

JeffKlickPhoto-138-207-06162014A Challenge to My Fellow Grandparents

By Dr. Jeffrey A. Klick

“Grandchildren are the crown of the aged, and the glory of children is their fathers.” Proverbs 17:6

As I was sitting in the hospital room holding our fifth granddaughter, the revelation hit me that I was no longer a young man. I know it should have dawned on me sooner, but I was too busy to dwell on such things. Having turned fifty-three recently (and two additional grandchildren later,) my thoughts yet again turn to those who will follow in my steps when I leave this earth for my reward. What am I leaving them? How will I be remembered?

When our first granddaughter arrived, there was an instant bonding between us, at least from my point of view. I held her in my arms and delight filled my heart as I gazed at that little girl. I marveled and rejoiced that I had lived to see this day. At age 42, it was quite a jolt to be a grandfather, but it was a delightful shock! When Lydia arrived, my wife and I needed to evaluate our roles as grandparents. We were not her parents, yet there seemed to be something we were supposed to be doing beyond what the bumper stickers proclaimed about grandchildren (Spoiling them and sending them home, or spending their inheritance.) There certainly was a strong generational connection, but we were not sure what our responsibilities were.

Those of us, who have given our lives for the raising of our children, can find it somewhat confusing as to our new roles as grandparents. As parents, we exercised almost complete control over our children until they were adults. Eating, sleeping, education, clothing and just about every other decision was made on behalf of the child, or at least in concert with them. As our children grew, we were very involved right up until they left our home. Now, here is a newborn baby and the temptation is to resume our former roles. However, this must be resisted! These little ones are not ours, but belong to other parents who are just beginning the task we have completed. So what are we supposed to do as grandparents?

Here are a few lessons we have learned on this grandparent journey over the last eleven years. First, pray often for the new parents. They need wisdom and insight on how to adjust to the new family member and they will need an abundance of guidance as the child grows. Second, be available to assist in babysitting, house cleaning, cooking, and any practical matter needed. Like so many, it would have been wonderful to have a night out now and again when our children were young. We simply did not have that option. Now we can provide that for our grown children and they have all told us that it is such a blessing! Third, always remember to turn the heart of the child back to the parents. These precious gifts are not yours, but belong to their parents. Our job as grandparents is to reinforce what the parents want, not to contradict or undermine. Sometimes this can be challenging, because by the time we become grandparents we certainly have learned a few things from our experiences. We observe the mistakes of youth, and the temptation is to jump in and give an unsolicited opinion. A proverb I coined years ago goes like this:

“Woe to the man who gives his opinion when it is not being asked, it will be reckoned unto him as a curse!”

If we develop a trusting relationship with our children as they age, our opinions will be asked for and valued when they are older and in need of our assistance. However, giving our opinion to our adult children before it is asked for, will result in being labeled as a meddler and can damage your relationship for years.

One key point is that we must never undermine the parents to the grandchildren even if we disagree with the parents. If we observe harmful or dangerous behavior, then we must appeal to the parents discreetly, but never turn the hearts of the children away from their parents. We must reinforce what the parents are doing, not undercut it. Remember what you wish your parents had done when you had your children still at home…then try to be that person! When a grandchild asks us for anything, if the parents are around, we always send them back to the parents, thus keeping the lines of authority clear. Grandparents that sneak behind the parents’ backs are teaching rebellion and disrespect for authority, so we must be careful what we teach by our actions and attitudes!

As grandparents, we are modeling to another generation (whether we realize it or not) what it looks like to walk with God. Self-focused grandparents are missing a great opportunity to invest in the future. Our culture glorifies self-gratification and unfortunately, many godly people have bought into this lifestyle without considering the outcome of this choice. The thought goes something like this –”I have lived my whole life raising my children, now I’m going to enjoy life and take care of me!” This lifestyle is evidenced by multitudes of grandparents moving to the coasts or deserts instead of staying by their families. From my perspective, this is a waste of experience and a loss to the next generation. Someone said years ago that very few people in nursing homes regret not spending more time at the office or on vacation, but almost all regret the time lost with their families. We never get to spend time twice so we must choose wisely the first time!

Even if you feel you have nothing to offer because your life has been full of mistakes, you have your love and experience to offer. One of the best ways to gain knowledge is by learning from other people’s mistakes and then trying to avoid repeating them. How beneficial it would be for the older generation to pass on to the younger one the wisdom that was learned from all those mistakes! Do not waste them by keeping them all to yourself! Experiences should be passed on to those that follow us, both good and bad, for each possess a lesson or insight.

As grandparents, our goal should be to be godly examples that love and serve the next generation. We need to avoid violating the parents’ authority and instead reinforce it to their children. We are not called to spoil grandchildren, but to help in the training process of them. We are blessed to enjoy this gift from God and take our responsibilities seriously, and not simply live to gratify our flesh. Another generation is at stake and we must give ourselves selflessly to assist in capturing it for Christ!

I appeal to the grandparents (and future ones) that may be reading this book to consider their involvement with the next generation. Is warmer weather really worth missing this opportunity? Playing golf and having abundant free time is great, but what about investing in your grandchildren or great grandchildren? What about taking time to share your story with them? I love the ocean and taking walks enjoying breath-taking views, but I would rather not ever see them again, than miss my grandchildren’s lives! I can visit the ocean but moving away from my family is not an option. I would rather shovel ten feet of snow than miss the fellowship and joy of my children and grandchildren. Wouldn’t you? Your family needs you more than the RV Park or your Bunko partners.

What could you do to help? How about offering to homeschool the child or children one day a week for the frazzled mom? Perhaps babysitting once and awhile to allow the parents a night out for pleasure or even some necessary shopping. Please consider writing out your personal testimony for the next generation, sharing some of your success stories or failures, focusing on what you learned from them. We all have so much to offer—may we not waste our knowledge! Please prayerfully consider where and how you live out the rest of your days. It is not too late to reengage in the battle, for the next generation is at stake!

About Dr. Jeffrey A. Klick Dr. Jeff Klick has been in fulltime ministry for over thirty years (since 1981). He currently serves as the senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship in Kansas City, Kansas, a church he planted in 1993. Dr. Klick married his high school sweetheart, Leslie, in May of 1975. They have three adult children and ten grandchildren. Dr. Klick loves to learn and has earned a professional designation, Certified Financial Planner, earned a Master’s degree in Pastoral Ministry from Liberty Theological Seminary, a Doctorate in Biblical Studies from Master’s International School of Divinity, and a Ph.D. in Pastoral Ministry from Trinity Theological Seminary . In addition to serving as senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship, Dr. Klick is a consultant with The Institute for Church Management, weekly shares on two radio shows on the Alive in Christ Radio Network, and also serves on the Board of Directors for The Council for Family-Integrated Churches. Dr. Klick is a frequent blogger on several websites and has published multiple books.

Blog and Personal Website: www.jeffklick.com

Author Page for all my books: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B009L3BNLW

Marriage: The Perfect Tool for Spiritual Growth

JeffKlickPhoto-138-207-06162014Marriage: The Perfect Tool for Spiritual Growth:

While earning two doctorate degrees, a foundational principle was hammered into my brain – look for presuppositions. Underneath every thought, vision, and action lay something that motivates and underpins. With every thought and action taken, each of us functions with many pre-assumptions.

For example, I operate under with the presupposition that you can read when I write this. In addition, there are assumptions regarding who will read it, how they will respond, and if they will catch the intended humor in the above sentence. We all bring many presuppositions to every thought and conversation, even if we are aware of possessing them.

I have a presupposition regarding marriage. In fact I have several. God is good, God had a plan, God knew what He was doing, and God had specific ideas in mind by creating the institution of marriage.

Here is one of my important pre-assumptions – Marriage is the perfect tool to help us mature in Christ. God knew exactly what it would take for each of His children to grow up. God decided that the vast majority of people would marry, reproduce, and fulfill His commands regarding discipleship, evangelism, and even care-taking of His creation.

While beyond the point of this article, marriage is a supernatural picture of Christ and the Church (Ephesians 5:32), the primary evangelism/discipleship tool for reaching the next generation (Deuteronomy 6:4-9), and God placed humans on earth to take care of it (Genesis 2:15).

What is the point of this writing is that marriage provides an excellent tool for spiritual growth. In fact, I believe it is one of the primary tools God uses to develop the fruit of the Spirit in His children’s lives. There is a gift of singleness, but the majority of God’s people will marry. Therefore, my presupposition is that God had a plan for this joining.

Science, along with detailed, extensive and expensive studies, reveal that men and women are different. I could have saved them a great deal of time and energy by simply asking any five-year old, but that is not the point. Men and women think differently, speak a different language and often have entirely different value systems. Is that by design or was it an oversight by the Creator? We must answer that question.

Your answer will determine your behavior. If God didn’t have a plan for the differences, then the goal becomes conforming our spouse into our image. We will spend our days and energy fighting the differences instead of embracing them. If God did create us differently, then there is another purpose for His decision to do so.

I would suggest that He did create us on purpose and fully intended for there to be major differences. We are created physically and emotionally differently. Any married couple quickly learns these facts. We tend to enjoy the physical differences and fight the emotional ones.

While not pretending to know the fullness of God’s wisdom or intent in His creation mindset, I would venture to state that He knew in advance what He was doing, and why. What we can know with certainty is that marriage provides some excellent spiritual growth potential!

For example, the fruit of the Spirit grows in the soil of marriage almost unlike anywhere else. Built right into our day by day relationship are the opportunities to walk in love, experience joy, seek peace, learn patience, demonstrate kindness, practice goodness, remain faithful, become gentle and walk in self-control. (See Galatians 5:22-23)

What better place to demonstrate agape love than in our marriage? 1 Corinthians 13 graces the walls of most homes, but do we actually put it into practice within those same walls? We can often quote it, but living it out is harder when it comes to our spouse. Yet, God placed that person right there in our lives to learn to do exactly that! We learn to walk in Biblical love through marriage.

Love is kind, patient, does not envy, boast, is not arrogant or rude, does not insist on its own way, is not irritable or resentful, bears all things, believes all things, hopes and endures all things. Love never fails and love is the greatest of what abides. What else besides marriage provides us with such an easy opportunity to grow in Biblical love? Who is closer to us to learn on and to actually put the love actions into practice? All of the love attributes are action words. They require an object and I would suggest that our spouse is the perfect choice.

As we look at spiritual maturity throughout the Scriptures, we will find descriptions that include such things as death to self, servanthood, esteeming someone as better than our self, humility, long suffering, patience, and overcoming all manner of sin. All of these and more are accomplished by marriage. We learn to grow in self control, we learn how to speak life not death with our tongue and we learn how to curb our anger. It is almost as if God knew (sarcastic humor) what was needed for spiritual maturity and came up with the perfect solution – the marriage covenant.

I would encourage you to read the following verses with your spouse in mind and see if my presupposition regarding marriage is true.

  • John 13:34-35 – we demonstrate the reality of Christ by our marriage
  • 1 John 4:20-21 – if our spouse is not our brother or sister in Christ I don’t know who is
  • Matthew 22:36-39 – two greatest commandments – love God, demonstrate it by loving your neighbor, again, if our spouse doesn’t qualify as our closest neighbor I don’t know who does.
  • Galatians 6:10 – is our spouse of the household of God? I think so.

We often attempt to implement these verses first towards those outside of our home. I would argue that unless we begin within the home we are missing what God intended. Frankly it is easier to love the stranger or someone across the globe, than loving my spouse, but I wonder what God thinks about that?

If my desire is to grow spiritually, then beginning to look for opportunities within my marriage is the place to start. At least, that is my presupposition. What’s yours?

Dr. Jeff Klick

About Dr. Jeffrey A. Klick

Dr. Jeff Klick has been in fulltime ministry for over thirty years (since 1981). He currently serves as the senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship in Kansas City, Kansas, a church he planted in 1993. Dr. Klick married his high school sweetheart, Leslie, in May of 1975. They have three adult children and ten grandchildren. Dr. Klick loves to learn and has earned a professional designation, Certified Financial Planner, earned a Master’s degree in Pastoral Ministry from Liberty Theological Seminary, a Doctorate in Biblical Studies from Master’s International School of Divinity, and a Ph.D. in Pastoral Ministry from Trinity Theological Seminary . In addition to serving as senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship, Dr. Klick is a consultant with The Institute for Church Management, weekly shares on two radio shows on the Alive in Christ Radio Network, and also serves on the Board of Directors for The Council for Family-Integrated Churches. Dr. Klick is a frequent blogger on several websites and has published multiple books.

Blog and Personal Website: www.jeffklick.com

Author Page for all my books: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B009L3BNLW

The Second Biggest Decision – Ladies Version

JeffKlickPhoto-138-207-06162014The Second Biggest Decision – Ladies Version

By Dr. Jeffrey A. Klick – A young man requested that I write something about what is important for him when considering a perspective bride and I did so in the post entitled, The Second Biggest Decision – Guys Version. This one will serve as the counterpart for the ladies.

Next to salvation, choosing your life partner is the biggest decision you will make this side of eternity. When your prince charming comes around, how will you recognize him? What if he is not on a white horse but in a beat up car? When he asks for your hand, should you give it? Choose wisely.

Biblically speaking marriage is supposed to be a lifelong commitment between a man and a woman. In our day, divorce runs rampant, and many forces are attempting to redefine the family, but that does not change the standard held out in Scripture. Once the rose-colored glasses are removed and real life settles in, the man you marry is non-returnable in God’s eyes. Even with the exceptions given in Scripture, the preferred goal is one spouse for life. My often-used saying is,

“It is far better to be happily married for forty years then to be miserably married for fifty!”

If it takes ten years for the right man to come along, it is better to wait. Being single and serving the Lord, is better than being married and miserable. I have spent the last 30 years of my life testing this sentence in the counseling office. It is true. Your life partner will have a direct impact on your ability to serve the Lord and your personal well-being, and therefore must be chosen carefully.

Most couples that marry begin their relationship by initially being attracted by appearance. For the record, that is normal and acceptable. Who wants to marry someone they cannot stand to look at? As those of us know that have a few years on our bodies now, looks come and go. What is possible to look like at 20 is near impossible at 40 or 50. Weight comes, hair leaves, and lines deepen. Young Prince Charming will turn into Old King George sooner than later. We all age, so basing our relationship simply on looks is foolish.

Beyond physical attractiveness, many traits should be considered. I am assuming that you are a strong believer and desire to please the Lord in your life. If you are not, then you have no business looking for a spouse at this time anyway! Your relationship to the Lord has to be primary in your life for when hard times come; it is what will help carry you through them.

This is not about how to get a husband or the best method to use, but what to look for in a perspective one, so I will not develop that topic. I also am not going to develop the timing issue regarding ages and such. God has given you parents and pastors that can help you in this arena. If possible, stay under your father’s protection and ask your family about the perspective spouse. Many times your brother(s) if you have one can give you insight into how a guy thinks and what his motives are in any given situation. Be humble and listen to those that God has put in your life and you will rejoice later on if you do.

Perhaps a few questions might be in order as to your motives for considering marriage – Am I ready for the commitment? Are my parents in agreement, not just giving in to me, but are they actually supportive of this relationship? Is my walk with God consistent enough? Am I a servant or selfish? Is this the right time? Am I attempting to run away from home by this relationship? Do I like my perspective mate or are there many things I intend to change in him after he says, “I do?” While no one is ever completely ready for marriage, when we get the release from the Lord and the authorities in our life regarding timing, we begin the exciting process of prayerfully waiting for our prospective mate! While the Cinderella-JeffKlickyoung man chooses his bride, the young ladies are given the task of waiting, patiently until chosen.

Shortly after birth, and often while they wait, many young ladies make extensive lists on what to look for in their future groom. Praying specifically about this is good, so I would not want to dampen that list, but I would suggest that these three things that I told my daughters be included.

1. Does the young man love the Lord with a heart to serve Him? Marriage is hard work sometimes and our relationship with the Lord is our anchor to steady the ship during the storms. If his love for God and His Word is not strong, his love for you will also not be as strong as it could be. There will be a direct correlation between his love for the Lord and his love for his wife. If the Lord is not first in his life, he will not have the necessary foundation upon which to build. Firm foundations provide something good to build upon, what do weak ones do?

2. Is the young man teachable? A know-it-all, arrogant young man typically grows into a know-it-all, arrogant older man. God is opposed to the proud but gives grace to the humble, the Bible teaches, and who does not need or want more grace? Being young and inexperienced is not a fault, being proud and unteachable is. If no one can speak into the life of a young man before marriage, what do you think the chances of your being heard by him are after marriage? How quickly does the young man repent and admit that he was in error about something? How does he line up under the authorities in his life? How does he treat his parents and siblings? All give insight into how he will treat you later on. Many daughters love their fathers and often wish their future husbands could be like their dad. If they are teachable when young, the father will be able to speak into his life to help him grow. If he will not listen to anyone about anything, what chance is there of that happening? God is and will be gracious, but the road may be difficult as you have to watch God discipline and break a proud husband.

3. Is the young man kind? Proverbs 19:22 in the NASB translation, states, “What is desired in a man is kindness.” If you marry a kind young man, you will be most likely end up being married to a kind older man later on. If you marry a self-centered, selfish, harsh young man, you most likely will spend a great deal of time in counseling and crying. How does this man interact with his family, peers, those of the opposite sex? How does he treat those less fortunate? Is he generous? A harsh man does not make a loving husband, and overlooking this fault will lead to a lifetime of pain. If a young man is not nice and kind to you during the period of pursuing you when he is on his best behavior, what do you think he will act like after he has caught you?

There is nothing magic that takes place during a wedding ceremony. What a person is before they say, “I do,” will simply be more clearly revealed after the wedding celebration takes place. Most people are on their best behavior during the courtship process and this can lead to some artificial representations. It is best to observe from a distance before jumping into a relationship. How a young man treats his family, friends, and authorities can be observed and is usually a pretty good reflection of how he will soon treat you. Again, choose wisely. Marriage is a pressure-filled experience. If children follow, the pressures increase. It is best to make sure that what is squeezed out of your man by pressure include a love for the Lord, teachableness, and being kind!

The three points above are by no means the full picture, but if these three were not there, I would very quickly walk away, or better yet, never begin the relationship! In addition to loving the Lord, being kind and teachable, there are multiple other factors to prayerfully consider. For example, his maturity level, emotional stability or moodiness, common interests and dreams, vision for the future, family planning goals, the handling of money, and communication skills all should be considered regarding compatibility. A wife in the Biblical sense helps complete the man. She is given to him to help him in his life to accomplish what God desires. If you do not like what God has called him to do or become, why would you want to partner with him for life?

A good rule of thumb is that if everyone around you is questioning the relationship, so should you! The old saying is that “love is blind.” I pray that you will not be. Listen to those that are more objective and love you; they just might see something that you do not.

Marriage is wonderful; a mystical picture of Christ and the Church, and God is the One that came up with the idea. Adam and Eve were the first married couple and all of history will end with a wedding feast! Jesus preformed His first miracle at a wedding and God has specific commands for those that will marry. A young lady becomes a bride and this decision will affect her for the rest of her days. It is an exciting time and marriage is a gift from God. I pray that each young lady will seek the Lord regarding this choice and that many godly generations will come forth as a result.

For a detailed discussion on this topic, please visit: http://www.hopefamilyfellowship.org and listen to the Pre-Marriage Seminar

Pastor Jeff Klick

About Dr. Jeffrey A. Klick Dr. Jeff Klick has been in fulltime ministry for over thirty years (since 1981). He currently serves as the senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship in Kansas City, Kansas, a church he planted in 1993. Dr. Klick married his high school sweetheart, Leslie, in May of 1975. They have three adult children and ten grandchildren. Dr. Klick loves to learn and has earned a professional designation, Certified Financial Planner, earned a Master’s degree in Pastoral Ministry from Liberty Theological Seminary, a Doctorate in Biblical Studies from Master’s International School of Divinity, and a Ph.D. in Pastoral Ministry from Trinity Theological Seminary . In addition to serving as senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship, Dr. Klick is a consultant with The Institute for Church Management, weekly shares on two radio shows on the Alive in Christ Radio Network, and also serves on the Board of Directors for The Council for Family-Integrated Churches. Dr. Klick is a frequent blogger on several websites and has published multiple books.

Blog and Personal Website: www.jeffklick.com

Author Page for all my books: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B009L3BNLW

The Second Biggest Decision – Guys Version

JeffKlickPhoto-138-207-06162014The Second Biggest Decision – Guys Version

By Dr. Jeffrey A. Klick – A young man requested that I write something about what is important for him when considering a perspective bride. I thought perhaps you might find it interesting as well.

Next to salvation, choosing your life partner is the biggest decision you will make this side of eternity. This choice is not like buying a car or bringing home a new puppy, but will have a direct influence on you every day for the rest of your life. Choose wisely.

Biblically speaking marriage is supposed to be a lifelong commitment between a man and a woman. In our day, divorce runs rampant, but that does not change the standard held out in Scripture. A man can trade in his car and give his puppy away, but his spouse is non-returnable in God’s eyes. Even with the exceptions given in Scripture, the preferred goal is one spouse for life. My often-used saying is, “It is far better to be happily married for forty years then to be miserably married for fifty!” If it takes ten years to find the right woman, it is better to wait.

There are many verses directly related to marriage and I would strongly encourage any young man to review them often as he enters the time of seeking his bride. I will not develop them here but a partial listing includes Malachi 2:13-16, 1Corinthians 7, Ephesians 5:22-33, 1 Peter 3:1-7, and of course, dozens scattered throughout the book of Proverbs. A life partner will have a direct impact on your ability to serve the Lord and therefore must be chosen carefully.

While most young men are attracted to the outside of the perspective bride, and that is good and normal, the inside is far more important. Beyond physical attractiveness, many traits should be considered. I am assuming that you are a strong believer and desire to please the Lord in your life. If you are not, then you have no business looking for a spouse at this time anyway!

I am not going to develop the timing issue for when to consider taking a spouse but I would strongly encourage you to work with your parents as to this critical decision. There are two primary questions regarding marriage; when and who. A few questions to discuss, and have good answers for, include: Am I able to take on the responsibility of a wife and family both spiritually and financially? Are my parents in agreement that this is the right time? Is my walk with God consistent enough? Am I attempting to get away from a problem via marriage? While no one is ever completely ready for marriage, when we get the release from the Lord and the authorities in our life regarding timing, we begin the exciting process of prayerfully seeking our prospective mate!

Here are three key points to consider when looking for a potential spouse:

1. Does the young lady love the Lord with a heart to serve Him? Marriage is hard work sometimes and our relationship with the Lord is our anchor to steady the ship during the storms. If her love for God is not strong, her love for you will also not be. There will be a direct correlation between her love for her Lord and her love for her husband. If the Lord is not first in her life she will not have the necessary foundation upon which to build.

2. Dose the young lady love the Word of God? Given the changeable nature of our society and our emotions, we must build upon something that does not shift like the sand. The Scripture must be a priority and our basis for our belief system. Considering a young lady that has little or no Scriptural understanding in not wise. God’s will and ways must be first and not human emotions and intellect.

3. How does the young lady get along with and treat her family? After you say, “I do,” you are family! If she is cold, angry, selfish and rebellious now, how do you think she will be shortly after you are married? If she has an attitude problem towards her authorities before marriage, do you think that will change when you step into the position of being her authority? If she is self-absorbed now will that change after marriage? From a more positive point of view, if the young lady is a servant now, that will most likely grow. If she is kind and generous now, those attributes will also continue. If she can lovingly submit to her parents today, that is usually a good indication that she will honor and respect you after you marry.

There is nothing magic that takes place during a wedding ceremony. What a person is before they say, “I do,” will simply be more clearly revealed after the wedding celebration takes place. Most people are on their best behavior during the courtship process and this can lead to some artificial representations. It is best to observe from a distance before jumping into a relationship. How a young lady treats her family, friends, and authorities can be observed and is usually a pretty good reflection of how she will soon treat you. Again, choose wisely.

The three points above are by no means the full picture, but if these three are not there, I would very quickly walk away! In addition to loving the Lord, the Word of God, and personal observation of her interaction with those around her, there are multiple other factors to prayerfully consider. For example, her maturity level, emotional stability or moodiness, common interests and dreams, vision for the future, family planning goals, the handling of money, and communication skills all should be considered regarding compatibility. A good rule of thumb is that if everyone around you is questioning the relationship, so should you! The old saying is that “love is blind.” I pray that you will not be.

Marriage is wonderful, a mystical picture of Christ and the Church, and God is the One that came up with the idea. Adam and Eve were the first married couple and all of history will end with a wedding feast! Jesus preformed His first miracle at a wedding and God has specific commands for those that will marry. A young man takes a bride and this decision will affect him for the rest of his days. It is an exciting time and marriage is a gift from God. I pray that each young man will seek the Lord regarding this choice and that many godly generations will come forth as a result.

For a detailed discussion on this topic please visit:  http://www.hopefamilyfellowship.org/topics2.php and listen to the Pre-Marriage Seminar

Pastor Jeff Klick

About Dr. Jeffrey A. Klick

Dr. Jeff Klick has been in fulltime ministry for over thirty years (since 1981). He currently serves as the senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship in Kansas City, Kansas, a church he planted in 1993. Dr. Klick married his high school sweetheart, Leslie, in May of 1975. They have three adult children and ten grandchildren. Dr. Klick loves to learn and has earned a professional designation, Certified Financial Planner, earned a Master’s degree in Pastoral Ministry from Liberty Theological Seminary, a Doctorate in Biblical Studies from Master’s International School of Divinity, and a Ph.D. in Pastoral Ministry from Trinity Theological Seminary . In addition to serving as senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship, Dr. Klick is a consultant with The Institute for Church Management, weekly shares on two radio shows on the Alive in Christ Radio Network, and also serves on the Board of Directors for The Council for Family-Integrated Churches. Dr. Klick is a frequent blogger on several websites and has published multiple books.

Blog and Personal Website: www.jeffklick.com

Author Page for all my books: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B009L3BNLW

What’s the Point of Praying?

JeffKlickPhoto-138-207-06162014What’s the Point of Praying?

By Dr. Jeffrey A. Klick – If you are bothered by honest confessions of someone that struggles then perhaps this would be a good time to quit reading. I have been a Christian for almost 40 years and a pastor for over 30, yet I struggle.

Sometimes I just do not get this whole prayer thing. Shocking isn’t it. There are times when I beg God to do something, change someone’s heart, heal, bring to salvation or repentance, you name it, and absolutely nothing happens. My prayers seem to vaporize as soon as they leave my mouth. Is God really listening and does He even care? “You say this and you are a pastor? I am appalled with your lack of faith and depth of understanding,” some might think.

My faith however is not the issue, neither is my head knowledge or understanding. I trust God, I just struggle with how and why to pray sometimes. If He is indeed the Sovereign Lord of the Universe and is working out all things after His perfect will, then where does prayer fit in? If everything is already known and no one can thwart His will, why bother to ask Him to do something? Maybe you have had the same thoughts. Maybe not, but I bet you know someone who has.

For the record I am not into Open Theism, formula praying, positive confession or anything like that, I just am trying to be honest here. I have prayed for some things for over 40 years and they have not happened. I have prayed for the sick and they died. For marriages to stay together that did not. For people to repent who have not and for relationships to be restored that were not. So, my question still remains – why bother praying?

I was raised in a church that bound the devil and loosed the Holy Spirit. How many times does the old devil need to be bound before he is? Is the Holy Spirit really bound up so He needs to be loosed by me? That devil sure must be slippery to get out of all that binding and the Holy Spirit must be covered in glue to need to be freed up all the time. I am not intending to be offensive to those who practice such things; I just cannot help but wonder why these practices never work long term and how accurate these methods really are biblically speaking. OK, I really do not wonder at all, but I am trying to be nice.

So, back to my dilemma. If God is going to do what God is going to do, why do I pray? Why do I bring my requests before Someone that may or may not do what I want? Is this just some guessing game and if I say the right words in the proper order than God will grant my request but if I do not then He doesn’t have to? Maybe I am not sincere enough? Maybe if I really believed and my faith was stronger, God would answer more often according to my wishes and desires. The Scripture does state that the prayers of a righteous man accomplishes much (James 5:16) so maybe I am not righteous enough? Wait, my righteousness is completely based on what Jesus did on the cross, so that isn’t it. Jesus said if I had faith as small as a mustard seed great things could happen, and my faith is at least that big.

Jesus told His disciples how to pray in the Lords’ prayer and He often spent entire nights in prayer. What did Jesus pray during those times? Wouldn’t that be great to have a copy of that discourse! We don’t of course so we are back to wondering. I do remember something about settling on God’s will instead of His own desires in a garden…

Lest you think I am totally lost, I do pray. I bring my requests before my Lord and Savior who sits on the throne of grace and mercy. I cry, sigh, moan and groan. I sing, bow and am silent before Him. I sit, listen, and try to quiet my soul before Him and I wait.

As I do such things, I change. My anxious heart slows down some and my mind quits racing. My view of life takes a turn towards the heavenly perspective and peace ensues. I enter into a time of worship and though my requests may not be answered, my relationship deepens with my Lord. Peace settles in and a quiet confidence that all will be well someday covers me. Maybe God will not do what I want, but do I really want that anyway? Maybe the point of prayer is not to tell God what to do but to quiet down and learn to listen to Him and seek what He wants. Now that is a novel thought. Maybe God really is God and perhaps God knows what He is doing and though it may be in eternity, all will be well.

Maybe the point of prayer is not to change God’s will and purposes but to get my heart to align with His. Perhaps prayer is not simply bringing my laundry lists of requests to the One who knows all and demanding that He does them, but maybe, just maybe, prayer is for me to change in His presence. The more I think about it, maybe is the wrong word. God is not the One that needs changing, I am. God is not the One Who is out of control emotionally, I am. God is not the One that needs to regroup and refocus, I am. Perhaps the point of praying is for me to come to the realization that I am not God and that He is.

While there is more to it that this, there is not less – the point of praying is to change me, and not God’s mind or will, and I am just fine with that. With that I will close now, because I need to go pray.

About Dr. Jeffrey A.

Klick Dr. Jeff Klick has been in fulltime ministry for over thirty years (since 1981). He currently serves as the senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship in Kansas City, Kansas, a church he planted in 1993. Dr. Klick married his high school sweetheart, Leslie, in May of 1975. They have three adult children and ten grandchildren. Dr. Klick loves to learn and has earned a professional designation, Certified Financial Planner, earned a Master’s degree in Pastoral Ministry from Liberty Theological Seminary, a Doctorate in Biblical Studies from Master’s International School of Divinity, and a Ph.D. in Pastoral Ministry from Trinity Theological Seminary . In addition to serving as senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship, Dr. Klick is a consultant with The Institute for Church Management, weekly shares on two radio shows on the Alive in Christ Radio Network, and also serves on the Board of Directors for The Council for Family-Integrated Churches. Dr. Klick is a frequent blogger on several websites and has published multiple books.

Blog and Personal Website: www.jeffklick.com

Author Page for all my books: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B009L3BNLW

“I Don’t Belong”

JeffKlickPhoto-138-207-06162014“I Don’t Belong”

By Dr. Jeffrey A. Klick – I sometimes hear the above sentence stated from folks at Hope, and even in my daily interaction with other believers who do not attend Hope. Or sometimes people will say something like, “I don’t measure up to the people around here,” or “I’m a second class citizen because I am not like everyone else,” or “I’m not part of the “in group” or, “I’m not good enough to attend there,” or a host of other similar ideas.

The truth is no one is part of the “in group” because there is not one. You will never be as spiritual as everyone else, because they are not even as spiritual as you have imagined them to be. They could not measure up to the standard that they are being told they have. There are no second-class citizens because we are all bond slaves of Jesus Christ and you can’t get any lower than that! You are correct if you feel you are not like everyone else, because we are all unique creations of God and no two people, or families, will be exactly alike. No one is good enough to go anywhere near God, except those who are washed in Jesus’ blood. So, in reality, we are all in the same boat. Sinners saved by God’s grace!

I think the truth is that we have an enemy that lies to us. The devil hates us and wants to destroy us. When we entertain thoughts like any of the above views, we are listening to a lie. When we listen to a lie, we are not listening to the truth … what a profound statement! The truth is that we are all “a work in process.” God is working in each one of us and He will not fail, and He does not make junk. Entertaining lies will not help us grow up into the fullness of Christ.

When we compare ourselves with others the Bible states that we are unwise. We should imitate what is good in others, but feeling insecure or less worthy than someone else is an improper application. We are all slaves of Christ and are required to take up our cross daily and die. Therefore, we have nothing to boast of, or anything to look down on anyone about. We are all struggling saints trying to walk on the highway of holiness aiming for the goal of pleasing our Lord and Master. Some believers will be ahead of us, and others behind, but the Owner of the highway is the key, not where we are on it that matters.

If we feel “left out” we should reach out. If we feel guilty or ashamed of something we are doing, perhaps we need to reevaluate the activity and repent if need be. If our Lord and Master is pleased with the activity then we will have no reason to feel insecure regardless of what others may think. As long as our activities do not cause another to stumble or present an appearance of evil, we are fine. If God is not pleased with something in our lives then we want to stop it and remove it totally from our lives as quickly as possible.

The Church is made up of unfit building material that the Master Builder is molding into a marvelous work of beauty. Each piece of a building is necessary even if the piece does not understand exactly how it fits. One piece is not more or less valuable than another piece; they simply have a different purpose in our Master’s plan. Let’s work on encouraging each other not comparing each other to some unreal standard. Let’s work on helping each other press in to achieve everything that God has for us in His plan and work. Much time and effort is wasted in jealousy and selfish ambition in God’s Church. Let’s look at Him and quit looking at everyone else. After all, compared to Him we are all miserable failures that are simply saved by His grace and mercy, and therefore have no reason to boast or fear! We are to encourage each other not compete with each other. Let’s run the race with endurance and help each other finish strong.

About Dr. Jeffrey A. Klick Dr. Jeff Klick has been in fulltime ministry for over thirty years (since 1981). He currently serves as the senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship in Kansas City, Kansas, a church he planted in 1993. Dr. Klick married his high school sweetheart, Leslie, in May of 1975. They have three adult children and ten grandchildren. Dr. Klick loves to learn and has earned a professional designation, Certified Financial Planner, earned a Master’s degree in Pastoral Ministry from Liberty Theological Seminary, a Doctorate in Biblical Studies from Master’s International School of Divinity, and a Ph.D. in Pastoral Ministry from Trinity Theological Seminary . In addition to serving as senior pastor at Hope Family Fellowship, Dr. Klick is a consultant with The Institute for Church Management, weekly shares on two radio shows on the Alive in Christ Radio Network, and also serves on the Board of Directors for The Council for Family-Integrated Churches. Dr. Klick is a frequent blogger on several websites and has published multiple books.

Blog and Personal Website: www.jeffklick.com

Author Page for all my books: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B009L3BNLW

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